Advice for UX Shops of One in Libraries

Advice for UX Shops of One in Libraries

On Twitter recently, I was asked for advice about setting up a new one-person UX shop in a library. I’ve only recently emerged from the UX-shop-of-one world, thanks to the addition of a part-time UX designer to my “team” and am not entirely sure how much my experience yields universal insights. So consider the following caveats about how institutional differences will affect the usefulness of any…

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No Longer a UX Shop of One

No Longer a UX Shop of One

Last fall, I was given the OK to hire a part-time user experience designer, which meant that my library’s user experience team was no longer a one-person operation. For the past four years, I’ve been working mostly on my own, although I frequently did projects that paired me up with others in the library (such as the time I worked with the head of access services to set up our new online…

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Roger Schonfeld, “Block that PC! Forcing Your Organization to Engage the Mobile User Experience,” Scholarly Kitchen

Roger Schonfeld, “Block that PC! Forcing Your Organization to Engage the Mobile User Experience,” Scholarly Kitchen:

Pull quote: “Limiting access to desktop versions, and encouraging engagement with the off-site experience, could be a very good way to startle one’s colleagues into an improved understanding of  researcher needs and opportunities to improve the services offered to support them. The point though is not to cause pain, but rather to have the whole team engaged in the types of improvements that can be made.”

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Jon Udell, “Hands on: Slack gets a real-world teamwork test,” InfoWorld

Jon Udell, “Hands on: Slack gets a real-world teamwork test,” InfoWorld:

Pull quote: “

It’s great that Slack, IFTTT, and Zapier offer long lists of point-to-point integrations. But simply because I can make something out of a feed doesn’t mean I should have to. Of course, most users can’t or won’t. But those lists can’t grow infinitely long. There needs to be a general-purpose fallback. In theory that’s still RSS/Atom feeds. In practice I find, too often, it isn’t.”

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Brian Lavoie and Constance Malpas, “Stewardship of the Evolving Scholarly Record: From the Invisible Hand to Conscious Coordination,” OCLC

Brian Lavoie and Constance Malpas, “Stewardship of the Evolving Scholarly Record: From the Invisible Hand to Conscious Coordination,” OCLC:

Pull quote” The long-term future of the scholarly record in its fullest expression cannot be effectively secured with stewardship strategies designed for print materials.”

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Walt Crawford, “Idealism and Opportunism,” American Libraries – June 2015

Walt Crawford, “Idealism and Opportunism,” American Libraries – June 2015:

Pull quote: “Most OA journals (67%) do not
add article-processing charges
(APCs) or other author-side fees;
they are funded through other
means. But most of the articles in
OA journals (64%) were in journals
that do charge APCs, at least some
of the time. Those statements are
both true.”

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Barbara Fister, “Schooling for Scandal,” Library Babel Fish | InsideHigherEd

Pull quote: “One thought I’ve had is to have students trace the history of a retraction …. Find the original paper, see what news outlets covered it and whether they reported the research accurately, find out how the study was challenged and on what basis, and do an analysis of what factors played into the controversy. Then have them interview a faculty member about their experiences publishing research (something I already do pretty regularly) so that they get a perspective on how it normally goes. I hope that by learning how someone they know experiences the peer review process and digging into what happens when it goes wrong, students will be able to see some of the complexity of the culture surrounding scholarly work and where the failure points may be – without leaving them in a crisis of faith.”

(via Schooling for Scandal | Library Babel Fish | InsideHigherEd)

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