Jennifer Howard, “Breaking Down Menus Digitally, Dish by Dish,” The Digital Campus – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Pull quote: “Rebecca Federman, head of the library’s culinary collections, jokes that ‘people are hungry’ for menus to transcribe. But there’s truth in the joke. When it went live a year ago, ‘What’s on the Menu?’ posted 9,000 menus. It only took the public about three months to transcribe them all, handily beating the library’s projections.”

Jennifer Howard, “Breaking Down Menus Digitally, Dish by Dish,” The Digital Campus – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Jonathan Rochkind, “Umlaut described, again,” Bibliographic Wilderness

Pull quote: “Umlaut aggregates services for specific citations from multiple internal and external service providers and knowledge bases. (catalog, link resolver, Amazon, HathiTrust, ILL, many more). It has no knowledge base of it’s own, it provides ‘just in time’ responses; Umlaut fills the need of what you do after ‘discovery’, the ‘last mile’ — I’ve found something I’m interested in, what can I do with it through resources provided or selected by my institution?”

Jonathan Rochkind, “Umlaut described, again,” Bibliographic Wilderness

Maura Smale, “Can We Flip the Library Classroom?” ACRLog

But what about asking students to do some work before they join us in the library classroom? I’m sure many of us ask students to come to their library instruction sessions with a research topic in mind, especially for one-shots. We could ask them to view or read tutorials or research guides about the library catalog and databases before their one-shot, so they can jump right in once they get to the library. But will they do it? And are there other ways that we can take advantage of the flipped model to help students get more out of library instruction?

Maura Smale, “Can We Flip the Library Classroom?” ACRLog

Rick Anderson, “Defining ‘Authentic Librarianship,'” Peer to Peer Review

Pull quote: “[T]o me, authentic librarianship is motivated primarily by concern for those we serve as librarians, rather than by concern for our own agendas or preferences. To be more specific, ‘authentic’ would describe professional practice that is motivated by all of the following: Concern for the success of the library’s patrons in their particular tasks; Concern for the long-term intellectual welfare of the library’s patrons; Desire to further the goals of the library’s sponsoring institution.”

Rick Anderson, “Defining ‘Authentic Librarianship,'” Peer to Peer Review

Jon Udell, “Owning Your Words: Personal Clouds Build Professional Reputations,” Cloudline

Pull quote: “The problem with cross-blog conversation was that it was too loosely coupled. So now blogs do have forum-style comments which concentrate discussion but recreate the original problems: attenuation of identity, loss of ownership of data. Could we have the best of both worlds? Here’s how it might work. I want to participate in a comment thread on your blog. So I write my comment, post it to my personal cloud, capture its URL, and post the URL to your comment thread. Your blog’s comment system syndicates the text of my comment into the thread, identifying my personal cloud as the source.”

Jon Udell, “Owning Your Words: Personal Clouds Build Professional Reputations,” Cloudline

Lauren Pressley, “Lunch with Lynda (2/3): Librarians in the 21st Century,” Lauren’s Library Blog

Pull quote: “Over time, librarians have evolved from being servants who did what people asked to being service-focused and trying to anticipate the needs of our users and best meet them. I think one potential path the profession could take is to transition from a general trend of being service-focused to being more of a collaborator.”

Lauren Pressley, “Lunch with Lynda (2/3): Librarians in the 21st Century,” Lauren’s Library Blog

Alexis Madrigal, “Harvard vs. Yale: Open-Access Publishing Edition,” The Atlantic

Pull quote: “Earlier this week, Yale university student, Emmanuel Quartey, posted a video interview with the school’s librarian, Susan Gibbons, in which he asked her about open access publishing. Her response was far more ambivalent than the Harvard faculty council’s. Though she noted that open-access journals are more accessible, she worried that asking younger faculty to publish in open-access (presumably less prestigious) journals could jeopardize their chances to attain tenure. In essence, prestige would stay put but tenure would move away from younger Yale professors. So, the library would continue to support both open and closed-access journals.”

Alexis Madrigal, “Harvard vs. Yale: Open-Access Publishing Edition,” The Atlantic