Kevin Smith, “Lions and tiger and bears, OA, or, scaring the children, part 1,” Scholarly Communications @ Duke

Pull quote: “We should not allow FUD (fear, uncertainty & doubt), which is often spread by institutions that are trying to preserve the problem to which they see themselves as the solution (to paraphrase Clay Shirky), to narrow our vision of a sustainable system of scholarly publishing. The problem we should be addressing is predatory publications, OA and subscription-based, and publishing ethics across the board.”

Kevin Smith, “Lions and tiger and bears, OA, or, scaring the children, part 1,” Scholarly Communications @ Duke

Amy Cavender, “Learning HTML with Mozilla Thimble,” ProfHacker

Pull quote: “Last week, Mozilla released a new, online editor designed to make it easy for novices to create web pages using HTML and CSS. The editor, called Thimble, is part of Mozilla’s Webmaker project.

The project’s Get Started page offers two options: Start from scratch, which brings you to a mostly empty editor (and presumes you have some idea of what you’re doing), and Pick a project which—as one would expect—presents you with a list of projects to choose from.”

Amy Cavender, “Learning HTML with Mozilla Thimble,” ProfHacker

Jenica Rogers, “Killing Fear part 1: The Problem,” Attempting Elegance

Pull quote: “The challenge that I see in this is that some of our stakeholder expectations are in a totally different place from others, and equally far from our shared and recognized experiences. In short: We’re busily turning into a butterfly, to the delight of our students, and our faculty think we made a damn fine caterpillar.”

Jenica Rogers, “Killing Fear part 1: The Problem,” Attempting Elegance

Stephen Hay, “There is no Mobile Web,” The Haystack.

Pull quote: “Many developers also consider desktop browsers. And text browsers. And screen readers. And possibly print. Or e-books. Or whatever. Because the Web is about universally accessible structured content. Which data you get and use and in what form will depend on your device and your circumstances. Your context, if you are so inclined. And that will constantly be changing. So maybe it’s a semantic distinction and I’m simply exaggerating like the American I am. But as long as there are developers selling and building completely separate mobile websites or iPhone websites or iPad websites where well-designed universal websites would suffice, it’s not only a semantic distinction.”

Stephen Hay, “There is no Mobile Web,” The Haystack.

Peter Suber, “More than anyone wants to know about my position on delayed OA for books, even books about OA,” Google+

Pull quote: “Some of my defenders argue that it’s reasonable for an author of a book that will become OA to ask for an embargo period in order to earn some royalties. I agree, and btw, I say as much in the book itself. But there’s a simpler response in my case. I didn’t ask for the embargo. On the contrary, I asked for immediate or unembargoed OA, and failed to get it. The one-year embargo is a compromise with MIT Press.”

Peter Suber, “More than anyone wants to know about my position on delayed OA for books, even books about OA,” Google+

Kevin Smith, “No Magic Words, Or How To Read a Contract,” Peer to Peer Review – Library Journal

Pull quote: “Mathematicians have developed a very different approach to disseminating their own work, and accessing the work of their colleagues, from those that have developed in literature or anthropology. If the approach to publication contracts is to be made more rational and more attuned to the specific contexts that contracts are supposed to address, the disciplinary groups need to lead the way. We could make a lot of progress, I hope, if major scholarly societies drafted model publication agreements and offered them to their members to use.”

Kevin Smith, “No Magic Words, Or How To Read a Contract,” Peer to Peer Review – Library Journal