Datamuse,”Hitching Your Wagon to OA,” An Accidental Academic (Librarian)

Pull quote: “As a librarian, reading [Dave] Parry’s article makes me think of what librarians can do, both as professionals and as scholars ourselves, to push for openness in scholarship. Two key courses of action are advising and advocating around issues of copyright, and identifying and highlighting high quality OA journals across the disciplines. In academic institutions, especially smaller ones, libraries are already the go-to source for copyright information, clearances, and fair use assistance. To this we can add Creative Commons licensing advocacy, an important way for academics to maintain control of their work, rather than signing that control over to a publisher. Secondly, by identifying and highlighting high-quality OA publications, we are in a position to advocate for submitting to them when faculty are seeking publication venues for their work.”

Datamuse,”Hitching Your Wagon to OA,” An Accidental Academic (Librarian)

Karen Harker, “Evaluating collections…,” Being and Librarianship

Pull quote: “I’m intrigued because I’ve been trying to develop my own model of evaluating collections that I could use on a regular basis.  I’ve been fixated on a ‘tripod’ model, with 3 sets of 3 criteria – Usage, Scope and Depth – but I haven’t made much progress down this path. That is why this [user experience] diagram caught my attention.”

Karen Harker, “Evaluating collections…,” Being and Librarianship

Robinson Meyer, “The 17th-Century Paper Social Network,” The Atlantic

Pull quote: “Is this a 17th-century Twitter? Maybe. (Even before this scrap came to light, the promotional material for the play Brief Lives called Aubrey “the world’s oldest blogger.”) The scrap both does and doesn’t mirror a tweet — or a status update, or a Tumblr post, or anything on any social network. It has structural limits. It’s odd, jotted, and hasty. It brimming with scribbled social information, meaningful only to those steeped in its world. But most importantly: The medium isn’t treated carefully, and it doesn’t necessarily lend itself to kindness. It’s fast, thinking-out-loud writing.”

Robinson Meyer, “The 17th-Century Paper Social Network,” The Atlantic

Kevin Smith, “Now we see through a glass, darkly,” Scholarly Communications @ Duke

Pull quote: “So the big question for governments and funders as they consider how best to support the transition to public access is why some traditional publications cost so much (and would pass those alleged costs on to taxpayers) while Gold OA journals and Green self-archiving seem to be more cost-effective alternatives. A lot of additional transparency would be required before recommendations such as those in the Finch report could be taken seriously.”

Kevin Smith, “Now we see through a glass, darkly,” Scholarly Communications @ Duke

Eric Frierson, “The Dynamic Duo: The Web Developer and the Public Services Librarian,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe

Pull quote: “Public services librarians will garner more respect from their web development colleagues when they present findings from studies that illustrate real, measured, and significant user needs. Unlike an anecdote from the reference desk, ethnographic study comes with legitimacy. Recommendations seem less like complaints about the systems, and more like steps to take to meeting a shared goal of improved user experience. Conversely, the web developer equipped with the skills to design a system that addresses identified needs gets more respect as well. Instead of blaming inflexible interfaces for bad user experience, web developers can invent solutions and fix problems.”

Eric Frierson, “The Dynamic Duo: The Web Developer and the Public Services Librarian,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe

Ed Summers, “Wikimania Revisited,” inkdroid

Pull quote: “One example that stood out for me was NARA’s Today’s Document website which highlights documents from its collections. On June 1st, 2011 they featured a photograph of Harry P. Perry who was the first African American to enlist in the US Marine Corps after it was desegregated on June 1st, 1942. NARA’s Wikipedian in Residence Dominic McDevitt-Parks’ efforts to bring archival content to the attention of Wikipedians resulted in a new article Desegregation in the United States Marine Corps being created that same day…and the photograph on NARA’s website was viewed more than 4 million times in 8 hours.”

Ed Summers, “Wikimania Revisited,” inkdroid

Hadas Shema, “On Self-Citation,” Information Culture, Scientific American Blog Network

Pull quote: “It seems that self-citation make authors more visible. It’s like with SAT preparation courses: it’s not that you’ll do better than the others if you take them; it’s that you’ll do worse than the others if you don’t take them. Because of this effect, Fowler and Aksnes suggest not only to remove self-citations from citation counts, but to penalize them as well.”

Hadas Shema, “On Self-Citation,” Information Culture, Scientific American Blog Network