Jon Udell, “We Bought the Wrong Kind of Software?,” Innovation Insights | Wired.com

Pull quote: “When you’re evaluating a cloud-based application or service, as you will often be doing from now on, ask whether its developer has prepared it to work with other applications and services in the cloud. That might mean a formal API. Or support for the relevant Internet data-exchange standard. Or a data import/export feature. Or sensibly-designed URL patterns. Or all of these things. Please ask. If you don’t, you may someday realize you bought the wrong kind of software. And in a world that’s increasingly connected, or anyway should be, we will all suffer the consequences.”

Jon Udell, “We Bought the Wrong Kind of Software?,” Innovation Insights | Wired.com

Ken Varnum, “A Semester of Searches: Fall 2012,” [BLT] Blog for Library Technology

Pull quote: “The pattern of search volume overall is very regular and predictable year over year, as shown in this chart. For the previous two years, the peak day was on day 88; this year, it was (by slim margin of 175 searches), the following day, day 89 (November 27, 2012). Still the peaks and valleys track from year to year with clear regularity.”

Ken Varnum, “A Semester of Searches: Fall 2012,” [BLT] Blog for Library Technology

Catherine Pellegrino, “Some new things I tried this semester, Part 2: Summative assessment,” Spurious Tuples

Pull quote: “One thing I did learn from one of the two classes, though, is that of the students who clearly ‘got it,’ nearly all of them wound up citing journal articles from databases in their bibliographies. We talk about finding journal articles in the class session, but it gets a really quick, slapdash approach, and we spend a lot more time on other issues. Seeing how many of the successful bibliographies use articles makes me think that we need to switch things up and spend more time, and be a lot more deliberate, in our explanation and exploration of databases.”

Catherine Pellegrino, “Some new things I tried this semester, Part 2: Summative assessment,” Spurious Tuples

Catherine Pellegrino, “Some new things I tried this semester, part 1: The workshop class,” Spurious Tuples

Pull quote: “Then during class, we looked at a selection of the sources that students brought in, talked about what made them good or less-good sources, talked about how they’d found them, and used those as springboards to talk about places to search (databases, Google Scholar, Google tips, etc.), searching strategies (Boolean, keywords, etc.), and evaluating what they find. It’s a way to meet them where they are, acknowledge the skills that they already bring to class, and give them tools and strategies to take those skills further.”

Catherine Pellegrino, “Some new things I tried this semester, part 1: The workshop class,” Spurious Tuples

Richard Wallis, “Forming Consensus on Schema.org for Libraries and More,” Data Liberate

Pull quote: “Applying Schema.org markup to your bibliographic data is aimed at announcing it’s presence, and the resources it describes, to the web and linking them into the web of data. I would expect to see it being applied as complementary markup to other RDF based standards such as BIBFRAME as it emerges.”

Richard Wallis, “Forming Consensus on Schema.org for Libraries and More,” Data Liberate

Curry, Stephen, “PLoS ONE: from the Public Library of Sloppiness?,” Reciprocal Space

Pull quote: “think one of the important advantages of open access is that, by moving all the charges to authors, the real cost of organising and disseminating the scientific literature becomes visible. Authors at universities rarely see or care about library subscription charges, but the transparency of the OA model provides useful downward pressure on the costs of publishing. Let’s not forget that most of those costs are met from public or charitable purses.”

Curry, Stephen, “PLoS ONE: from the Public Library of Sloppiness?,” Reciprocal Space

“Fair Use of Textbooks – a Paradigm Case,” ARL Policy Notes

arlpolicynotes:

In discussing fair use in the educational realm, we often mention that copying and distributing excerpts from textbooks, workbooks, and the like will present a challenge for the would-be fair user, as they are typically not doing anything transformative with these materials. Making educational…

“Fair Use of Textbooks – a Paradigm Case,” ARL Policy Notes