Brian Mathews, “Haystacks vs. Algorithms: Is Scanning the Stacks for [Pretty] Books Really the Best Research Strategy?” The Ubiquitous Librarian – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Pull quote: “In libraries we see a different side of the academic lifecycle. We see students struggling to understand their assignments. We see students when they are stressed out. We see students feeling triumphant. We see a full range of emotions: happy, sad, excited, confused, discouraged, and so forth. We see them being super creative and super immature. I’m not sure that many teaching faculty observe the effort that goes into their coursework. They see the final product in the form of a paper or test or whatever, and they might talk with students during class time or office hours, but as librarians, we get to observe and interact with students while they are actively learning. It happens everyday all around us.”

Brian Mathews, “Haystacks vs. Algorithms: Is Scanning the Stacks for [Pretty] Books Really the Best Research Strategy?” The Ubiquitous Librarian – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Kevin Smith, “Of fences and defenses,” Scholarly Communications @ Duke

Pull quote: “If we understand fair use as a positive right that creates a boundary limiting the control of rights holders, we ought to be less afraid of exercising it. After all, we do not fear to walk on a public sidewalk just because some landowner might scream “trespass;” we recognize that rights over land have boundaries and do not shirk from exercising our positive right to use public land. The argument in this amicus brief points us to a similar confidence when exercising our fair use right. While we should respect the legitimate rights held by an intellectual property holder, we should not let attempts to expand those rights beyond the boundaries set by Congress dissuade us from making fair use of materials under this public right that is equally a defining part of copyright.”

Kevin Smith, “Of fences and defenses,” Scholarly Communications @ Duke

Barbara Fister, “Throwing the Books at Each Other,” Inside Higher Ed

Pull quote: “I just wish that we could talk about books as if they are for use, not as symbols of enduring knowledge that must be preserved against the ravages of digital barbarians or as emblems of obdurate and blinkered resistance to inevitable change.”

Barbara Fister, “Throwing the Books at Each Other,” Inside Higher Ed

Andy Burkhardt, “The Evolution of Library Instruction,” Information Tyrannosaur

Pull quote: “We want to help students become not just literate but sophisticated and fluent in their use of information. This involves not just learning skills but applying and practicing those skills to develop certain habits and dispositions. A student who is sophisticated when it comes to information does not just know how to evaluate a source of information, but would have have the habit of regularly questioning and critically examining information they come across instead of taking it at face value.”

Andy Burkhardt, “The Evolution of Library Instruction,” Information Tyrannosaur

Eric Phetteplace, “Describe Your Ideal Work Environment,” PataMetaData

Pull quote: “Every institution should have a simple ‘admin quiz’ one can take to receive appropriate privileges. I understand why we deny everyone by default; running an institution’s computers is hard work and ensuring consistent security and software settings is a great aid. But those of us who are capable of administering our own computers, who know to run antivirus software (or just not run Windows…sorry, I’m belaboring the point) and avoid sketchy links in emails, should be given that prerogative.”

Eric Phetteplace, “Describe Your Ideal Work Environment,” PataMetaData

Lauren Pressley, “Make It Easier To Learn,” lauren’s library blog

Pull quote: “Good design? It sets people up for cognitive ease. Good communication skills? Also sets people up for cognitive ease. User experience? The same. Which I’ve always focused on as an aspect of making it easier for people to learn and incorporate information. Though from [Daniel] Kahneman’s work I now see something that should have been obvious before: that’s it’s not always employed for good.”

Lauren Pressley, “Make It Easier To Learn,” lauren’s library blog

Sara Grossman, “Giving a TED Talk? Expect More Visibility, but Not More Citations,” Wired Campus – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Pull quote: “Specifically, the study found that giving a presentation at TED, an annual conference on technology and society, appears to have no effect on the number of citations a scholar’s work receives after a video of the presentation goes online.”

Sara Grossman, “Giving a TED Talk? Expect More Visibility, but Not More Citations,” Wired Campus – The Chronicle of Higher Education