Donna Lanclos, “Playing with Cognitive Mapping,” the Anthropologist in the Stacks

Pull quote: “In general, undergraduate space maps indicate the need for them to be in places that make it easy for them to get to the other places they need to go to. If they have class in a particular building, they are more likely to study in the Student Union than the library, because the former is closer. If they live away from campus, they might be likely to have off-campus cafes, etc. on their maps as work spaces. The choices they make about where to settle in to study are not made in a vacuum.”

Donna Lanclos, “Playing with Cognitive Mapping,” the Anthropologist in the Stacks

Jacob Berg, “Failure, Organizational Culture, and Library Management,” BeerBrarian

Pull quote: “I called a meeting of all our full-time and part-time staff, and told them to treat the library like a laboratory. We’re going to try some things here. We will fail some of the time, but that’s life, and I’ll do my best to limit the damage.”

Jacob Berg, “Failure, Organizational Culture, and Library Management,” BeerBrarian

Letters to a Young Librarian: You Can’t Get There From Here: Wayfinding in an Academic Library

Pull quote: “I knew I needed to test new ideas before putting money and effort into creating a final product. One example of this was how we created the new library directory. I would go up to students in different parts of the library and say things like, ‘I know this may seem like a silly question, but what would you call this room?’ Then, when I had a good draft of the list we wanted to use, I did the opposite – asked patrons, ‘I’m testing something for a new directory. Where in the library would you find [fill in the blank]?’”

Letters to a Young Librarian: You Can’t Get There From Here: Wayfinding in an Academic Library

Kevin Smith, “A line in the sand,” Scholarly Communications @ Duke

Pull quote: “This price increase, for that is what it is, is especially massive. If Harvard Business Publications cannot make do with the revenue they have had for decades and suddenly needs millions more, that is a problem with how they run their business, not with what EBSCO subscribers expect to get, and have gotten for years, for their subscription dollars. And they need to take that demand up with the platform provider, since it is that platform that they are insisting be broken.”

Kevin Smith, “A line in the sand,” Scholarly Communications @ Duke