Library Loon, “Context for Calgary,” Gavia Libraria

Pull quote: “Calgary’s memo—the Loon repeats, she has no insider information!—may have been a conscious, intentional poke at the hornet’s nest. If so, the Loon lauds it and hopes that more faculty, more librarians, and more campus IT units will be transparent about these takedown notices.”

Library Loon, “Context for Calgary,” Gavia Libraria

Audrey Watters, “Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2013: The Battle for ‘Open,'” Hack Education

Pull quote: “Aaron Swartz’s politics of ‘open’ were a politics. ‘Open’ wasn’t simply an adjective plugged into a press release, attached to a startup pitch, embedded in a tech blog headline. Aaron Swartz’s politics of ‘open’ were enmeshed with a challenge to intellectual property law; they offered a challenge to the economics of restricted access to scholarship; they were intertwined with the technologies of the open Web – and those technologies, let’s not forget, are political as well.”

Audrey Watters, “Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2013: The Battle for ‘Open,'” Hack Education

Karen Schneider, “Project Info Lit and the ‘Ginormous’ Problem,” Free Range Librarian

Pull quote: “A high school library may have a couple of databases; where I work, we trumpet that we have over sixty, and if we were a fancy school, you could multiply that five-fold. Even if high school students wanted to ramp up to college-level work, they don’t have the tools to do so. Furthermore, they have no awareness of the scale of college-level information resources. It had never occurred to me that when we crow about the bazillion resources we offer, we might be scaring the pants off students, and yet, without any context for all this new stuff, how could it not?”

Karen Schneider, “Project Info Lit and the ‘Ginormous’ Problem,” Free Range Librarian

Matthew Reidsma, “The Library with a Thousand Databases,” Matthew Reidsma

Pull quote: “By forcing our patrons to wander through a list of specialized tools organized by silo, we were making their search experience difficult. Usually they would wander around in confusion for a while, and if they were lucky, someone would hand them a sword or a piece of string so they could find their way through. We sent everyone from the search of the normal world, to a confusing special realm where the rules of search didn’t apply. We took something that people did every day and made it unfamiliar.”

Matthew Reidsma, “The Library with a Thousand Databases,” Matthew Reidsma

Audrey Watters, “Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2013: Data vs Privacy,” Hack Education

Pull quote: “This extraction of personal data – for the sake of profit or improved marketing or better algorithms – is a process that has spurred very little critical response among ed-tech proponents when it comes to the adoption of software and hardware. There are very few questions about data: who owns education data, who analyzes education data, who uses it.”

Audrey Watters, “Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2013: Data vs Privacy,” Hack Education

Dorothea Salo, “Linked Data in the Creases,” Peer to Peer Review

Pull quote: “If broadly adopted, the National Library of Sweden’s approach frees us from the eternal lipstick-on-pig question of how best to present eccentric, often inadequate, almost always expensively homegrown data to patrons. Instead, we will put the patron experience first, asking, ‘What data do patrons actually want to see or use, and before we go creating it, does it perhaps exist already in the vast existing web of data?’”

Dorothea Salo, “Linked Data in the Creases,” Peer to Peer Review