Richard Nurse, “Discovery or delivery,” Libwebrarian’s Blog

Richard Nurse, “Discovery or delivery,” Libwebrarian’s Blog:

Pull quote: “I found it interesting to work through the process that they went through, from realising that most users were starting their search elsewhere than the library (mainly Google Scholar) and so deciding to focus on making it easier for users to access library content through that route, instead of trying to focus on getting users to come to the library, to a library search tool. It recognises that other players (i.e. the big search engines) may do discovery better than libraries.”

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Junior Tidal, “2014 LACUNY Institute,” juniortidal.com

Junior Tidal, “2014 LACUNY Institute,” juniortidal.com:

Pull quote: “This then got me thinking about how database interfaces are just plain awful. They are not intuitive. I like to think that if they were, then we wouldn’t need to have classes on how to use them in the first place. Secondly, databases may not necessarily engage the user in a meaningful way. Look at Wikipedia for instance. Wikipedia links its pages back and forth throughout the site. If there is a term that a user sees on a Wikipedia page, 9 times out 10, a user can gain more information about that term and read about it. I feel there are very few resources that allow one to do that. I also feel that the database pages are so overwhelming. There are numerous fields, check mark boxes, and jargon labels that it can be a bit much for an incoming freshman who’s experience with online research may just be Google.com. What’s the solution? Already, it seems that APIs may be the best way to go. If there’s a coder who can construct a better interface, or even better yet, tailor it to a particular audience, then we don’t need the boring, overwhelming front-end of x database. I’ve also seen more databases, APIs and discovery services that are using the one search box form of interface that students who have grown with the Internet are accustom to.”

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Catherine Pelligrino, “Walking the walk may be trickier than it first appears: An open access publishing story,” Spurious Tuples

Catherine Pelligrino, “Walking the walk may be trickier than it first appears: An open access publishing story,” Spurious Tuples:

Pull quote: “Dear [Name]: Thank you for sending the publishing agreement for Johns Hopkins University Press and portal. I’m very pleased to see that I will retain the right to post a copy of the article on my personal or institutional repository or online site. Retaining the copyright to my professional work is also important to me, so I’m wondering if there is an alternate agreement, or if the current agreement can be altered, so that I retain the copyright but the Press still has the ability to do what it needs to do with the content. If not, the current agreement is fine and I will happily sign, [etc.]. But if an alternate agreement is possible, I would prefer to pursue that option. Sincerely, etc.”

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Aaron Schmidt, “Give Them What They Want,” The User Experience

Aaron Schmidt, “Give Them What They Want,” The User Experience:

Pull quote: “Why do some libraries insist on developing website content that is not being used? There’s no doubt it would be great if library users came to our sites to read book reviews, listen to podcasts, and calculate the value that the library delivers to them. We want to be a valuable resource. We want people to trust our opinions and rely on us for guidance. But just because this would be wonderful doesn’t mean it is going to happen.”

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Jessica Olin, “When the Answer is Always No (or at least it seems to be),” Letters to a Young Librarian

Jessica Olin, “When the Answer is Always No (or at least it seems to be),” Letters to a Young Librarian:

Pull quote: “Lots of people espouse an attitude of, ‘it’s easier to ask for forgiveness than it is to ask for permission.’ I’m not saying you should never do this, but I don’t recommend doing it at the beginning of your career (or during early days of a new job), and you should only do it sparingly if you are later in your career or in your tenure at a particular institution. Do this early on or too much, people will think they can’t trust you.”

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Tal Rozen, “Walkabout,” UX Lab

Tal Rozen, “Walkabout,” UX Lab:

Pull quote: “Ultimately, I decided that the walkabout project should take the form of a low-stress observational UX method for collecting supplementary user data. With the deliverable conceived as a running log of observations/insights, team members could then draw upon them to generate new ideas or buttress findings in their reports. Eventually compiling data from our raw field notes into a table, we could build a “library persona”, available as a poster or other visualization, to be used as a tool to ensure the consideration of the diverse and intersecting paths of users interacting with the library as it develops new user-centered services.”

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Iris Jastram, “Locations of Literacy: Information Literacy (plenary panel at MnWE 2014),” Pegasus Librarian

Iris Jastram, “Locations of Literacy: Information Literacy (plenary panel at MnWE 2014),” Pegasus Librarian:

Pull quote: “No, information literacy is about negotiating understanding within a context. It means being able to map out the community of inquiry and the various conversations that community is having. And then, it means being able to show that community where new knowledge fits. Parroting back other people’s conversations is not an effective conversation tactic in real life, right, so why should it work here? This is where you get to expand the conversation in very real terms. But even this mapping is not yet enough. It helps us see the social and relational aspect of information literacy, but it doesn’t highlight the very real importance of the local culture of these conversations.”

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