Chris Zammarelli, “On a Need to Know Basis,” Chris Zammarelli

Chris Zammarelli, “On a Need to Know Basis,” Chris Zammarelli:

Pull quote: “That is going to be our biggest challenge moving forward, because, while the hard numbers can be impressive, they don’t measure the impact the resources have had on our users. And that is really what is going to show the value of our services.”

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Wayne Bivens-Tatum, “The Best that Can be Done,” Academic Librarian

Wayne Bivens-Tatum, “The Best that Can be Done,” Academic Librarian:

Pull quote: “Really? That’s it? The best that can be done? Make me create an account, login to that account, install a plugin I shouldn’t need to read a PDF, fail to give me a PDF that I can read, and then tell me to go follow some special instructions and change browsers to view a file format I should be able to view with any standard browser. That’s the best that can be done?”

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Aaron Schmidt, “Developing a Service Philosophy,” The User Experience

Aaron Schmidt, “Developing a Service Philosophy,” The User Experience:

Pull quote: “Of these requisites, library staff might impact the user experience the most. After all, library workers are often the vehicle though which library service is delivered. And while an unusable website might be frustrating, a lousy customer service inter­action has the potential to do some serious damage to the library–member relationship. Humans are social creatures, and we all react emotionally to face-to-face encounters. What’s more, we’ve all had memorable customer service experiences—both good and bad—and have felt how that affects us.”

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Jacob Berg, “On ‘Pitching’ and What Goes Unmentioned,” BeerBrarian

Jacob Berg, “On ‘Pitching’ and What Goes Unmentioned,” BeerBrarian:

Pull quote: “There’s too much agency, too much bootstrapping, too much of what is basically the respectability politics of library advocacy (“if only I had pitched better!”). And while that’s important, sometimes it doesn’t matter how well you pitched, because it’s not up to you.”

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Stephanie Gioia, “Card Decks: Tactile Tools for Pattern Finders, Integrative Thinkers, and Inspiration Seekers,” UX Magazine

Stephanie Gioia, “Card Decks: Tactile Tools for Pattern Finders, Integrative Thinkers, and Inspiration Seekers,” UX Magazine:

Pull quote: “What gives card decks this unique power to create new meaning in the world? The basis of visual thinking is the analysis (i.e., disaggregation) of a complex idea into “nodes”, followed by the synthesis (i.e., reintegration) of those “nodes” through “links” into a new meaningful whole. At the most basic level, cards are “nodes” in search of “links.” In personal creative practice, card decks are a powerful problem-solving tool because we often know the parts of a problem or solution, but we don’t yet know how they fit together in an insightful way. Decks are a way for us to hold those nodes in creative tension until a pattern emerges.”

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Maura Smale, “Digging Into Institutional Data,” ACRLog

Maura Smale, “Digging Into Institutional Data,” ACRLog:

Pull quote: “Reader, I nearly missed dinnertime as I fell down the rabbit hole of the survey results. It’s a fascinating look at student data points at the 19 undergraduate institutions that make up the university. There’s the usual info you’d expect from the institutional research folks — how many students are enrolled at each college, part-time vs. full-time students, race and ethnicity, and age, to name a few examples. But this survey asks students lots of other questions, too. How long is their commute? Are they the first in their family to attend college? How many people live in their household? Do they work at a job and, if so, how many hours per week? How often do they use campus computer labs? Do they have access to broadband wifi off-campus? If they transferred to their current college, why? How do they prefer to communicate with faculty and administrators?”

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Richard Van Noorden, Brendan Maher, and Regina Nuzzo, “The top 100 papers,” Nature

Richard Van Noorden, Brendan Maher, and Regina Nuzzo, “The top 100 papers,” Nature:

Pull quote:” The colossal size of the scholarly literature means that the top-100 papers are extreme outliers. Thomson Reuter’s Web of Science holds some 58 million items. If that corpus were scaled to Mount Kilimanjaro, then the 100 most-cited papers would represent just 1 centimetre at the peak. Only 14,499 papers — roughly a metre and a half’s worth — have more than 1,000 citations (see ‘The paper mountain’). Meanwhile, the foothills comprise works that have been cited only once, if at all — a group that encompasses roughly half of the items.”

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