Walt Crawford, “Idealism and Opportunism,” American Libraries – June 2015

Walt Crawford, “Idealism and Opportunism,” American Libraries – June 2015:

Pull quote: “Most OA journals (67%) do not
add article-processing charges
(APCs) or other author-side fees;
they are funded through other
means. But most of the articles in
OA journals (64%) were in journals
that do charge APCs, at least some
of the time. Those statements are
both true.”

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Barbara Fister, “Schooling for Scandal,” Library Babel Fish | InsideHigherEd

Pull quote: “One thought I’ve had is to have students trace the history of a retraction …. Find the original paper, see what news outlets covered it and whether they reported the research accurately, find out how the study was challenged and on what basis, and do an analysis of what factors played into the controversy. Then have them interview a faculty member about their experiences publishing research (something I already do pretty regularly) so that they get a perspective on how it normally goes. I hope that by learning how someone they know experiences the peer review process and digging into what happens when it goes wrong, students will be able to see some of the complexity of the culture surrounding scholarly work and where the failure points may be – without leaving them in a crisis of faith.”

(via Schooling for Scandal | Library Babel Fish | InsideHigherEd)

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Roger Schonfeld, “Maintaining Relationships with Readers as They Cross Affiliations,” Scholarly Kitchen

Roger Schonfeld, “Maintaining Relationships with Readers as They Cross Affiliations,” Scholarly Kitchen:

Pull quote: “Today, most authorization is managed through institutional site licenses or through a user account that is controlled by the university or other content licensor. What if, instead, the researcher carried credentials associated with multiple institutional identities, so that one would have access to all the resources to which one is entitled? In this vision, we would need to develop a user account that is portable across institutional affiliations and across platforms, that is controlled not by either of those parties but rather that is owned or controlled by the researcher.”

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Roger Schonfeld, “Grab and Go and the Gravitational Pull of Discovery,” Scholarly Kitchen

Roger Schonfeld, “Grab and Go and the Gravitational Pull of Discovery,” Scholarly Kitchen:

Pull quote: “What is the equivalent of Facebook’s Instant Articles initiative? If the indexed discovery services drive increasing amounts of researcher traffic to scholarly content, it is easy to see advantages to putting increasing amounts of content “inside” the discovery services, or at least on their affiliated content platforms.”

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Michael Rodriguez, “Negotiate!” LITA Blog

Michael Rodriguez, “Negotiate!” LITA Blog:

Pull quote: “The key to negotiation is not to fold at the first “no.” Initial price quotes and contracts are a starting point for negotiation, by no means the final offer. Trim unneeded services to obtain a price reduction. Renegotiate, don’t renew, contracts. Ask to renew existing subscriptions at the previous year’s price, dodging the 5% annual increase that most providers slap on products. And take nothing at face value!”

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Roger Schonfeld, “Thinking Through the Lit Review: Part 2: Repackaging the Review Article,” Scholarly Kitchen

Roger Schonfeld, “Thinking Through the Lit Review: Part 2: Repackaging the Review Article,” Scholarly Kitchen:

Pull quote: “Could the review article’s organization and analysis of the field be used to improve discovery in other types of research workflows? There is extensive data implicitly present in such pieces about relationships among publications, which could be useful as a signal that articles are related to one another (offering up the possibility of implicitly curatorial in addition to semantic or usage based recommendations). A review’s annotation and discussion of individual sources would be quite valuable as signals for trust if incorporated in a discovery system, much as book reviews serve for monographs in online bookstores and licensed content platforms. Imagine seeing the one sentence blurb from a neutral scholar while conducting a search, or even the secondary social functionalities that could be developed.”

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Roger Schonfeld, “Thinking Through the Lit Review: Part 1: The Quest for Comprehensiveness,” Scholarly Kitchen

Roger Schonfeld, “Thinking Through the Lit Review: Part 1: The Quest for Comprehensiveness,” Scholarly Kitchen:

Pull quote: “I also wonder if bringing co-citation analyses into discovery environments would be helpful. In such a case, a researcher could somehow upload to a discovery tool a list of the references seen as most relevant on a topic. An automated analysis of what is most likely to be cited with those works would be returned – not unlike the way that a social network can suggest additional friends.”

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